How to Install Support for OUYA in Windows 8

I just added support for the OUYA on Windows 8, but it was fraught with peril.

I want to help by providing this little guide, so the next person won’t have as much trouble as I did. The OUYA developer has documentation to lead you through the process, but unfortunately that was not enough to get it working. Read on!

Android SDK

The first step is having a copy of the Android SDK installed. You’ll get this if you used “openfl setup android” and went through the steps, or if you go to the Android developer site. After you have the Android SDK on your system somewhere, you will need to run the “SDK Manager” which is in the same directory. Continue reading How to Install Support for OUYA in Windows 8

Deploying C++ to JavaScript using Emscripten

If you paid attention during the post-GDC news, you probably heard that Epic Games and Mozilla teamed up to get the Unreal Engine running in the browser, without plugins, in a matter of four days. The secret? Emscripten.

Alon Zakai has worked three years on Emscripten, and its an amazing piece of software.

Literally, you take C++ (or technically, something that compiles to LLVM), and out comes JavaScript. Not only can you do basic code, you can take large, complex projects with myriad dependencies, and actually run it in the browser.

Let’s take one of my previous samples, and port it to the browser. Ready? Continue reading Deploying C++ to JavaScript using Emscripten

Increase Battery Life in Linux

The main drawback I have experienced in using Linux on my laptop is the battery life.

Fortunately, there are several things you can do to extend the life of your battery. Now my laptop is running close to the same length of time as it would under Windows 7, and is going much longer than when I was testing the Windows 8 Consumer Preview. Continue reading Increase Battery Life in Linux

How to Create a Keystore for BlackBerry

If you’d like to publish an application on BlackBerry App World, you’ll need a keystore to sign your application.

This process will also create a debug token, which you can use to install and run on a QNX-based BlackBerry device (like the PlayBook) without having to release sign.

Step 1

We’ll start by requesting a code-signing key at https://www.blackberry.com/SignedKeys/

Enter your name, company, email, country and a 6-10 digit “PIN.” You’ll want to remember the PIN you use, since we will need it later. Continue reading How to Create a Keystore for BlackBerry

Getting Started with Haxe/JS in MonoDevelop

If you have not done it already, go to this post and install Haxe and MonoDevelop on your system.

It is easy to start writing haxe JS using MonoDevelop. Create a new solution by going to File > New > Solution in the menu.

Let’s start with something simple:

js.Lib.alert ("Hello World");

This will display a Javascript alert. Although this is slightly more verbose than a traditional alert, you may notice code completion can speed things up. Having a clean API, and not having to keep it memorized is a huge benefit. This style of code completion will work even for your own code you write. It is even possible to receive code completion for existing Javascript libraries, like jQuery or Sencha Touch. Continue reading Getting Started with Haxe/JS in MonoDevelop

Getting Started with Haxe/Flash in MonoDevelop

If you have not installed Haxe and MonoDevelop yet, go to this post to read the easy instructions.

You can make a new Haxe/Flash project in MonoDevelop by going to File > New > Solution from the menu.

Now that we have a new project, let’s try drawing a shape:

graphics.beginFill (0xFF0000);
graphics.drawRect (0, 0, 100, 100);

With the code in place, use Project > Run from the menu, Ctrl+F5 (Command+Alt+Enter on a Mac) on the keyboard. Continue reading Getting Started with Haxe/Flash in MonoDevelop

Getting Started with Haxe/C++ and NME in MonoDevelop

If you have not done so already, follow this post to install Haxe, NME and MonoDevelop.

If you would like to make a visual application, NME provides an array of features beyond the standard Haxe/C++ toolset. NME uses OpenGL, Freetype, libpng, libjpeg, cURL, SDL and other libraries to provide a Flash-similar API for C++ targets. NME is also designed to build applications for Flash and is compatible with Jeash, a library for HTML5 applications.

We can create a new application by going to File > New > Solution in MonoDevelop.

Now we are ready to write some code. Unlike a traditional Haxe/C++ project, the NME template extends the “nme.display.Sprite” class, which is similar to the Sprite class in Flash. We can begin by adding a simple shape, similar to how we would draw a rectangle in Flash: Continue reading Getting Started with Haxe/C++ and NME in MonoDevelop

Getting Started with Haxe/C++ in MonoDevelop

If you have not already, follow this post to install Haxe and MonoDevelop on your system.

To begin a new Haxe/C++ project, open MonoDevelop then go to File > New > Solution

You can select the “Empty Haxe/C++ Project” template, and enter a name and location for your new project. Continue reading Getting Started with Haxe/C++ in MonoDevelop

How to Install Haxe, NME and MonoDevelop

If you’d like to try Haxe or NME, here’s some steps to get you started.

First, go to http://www.haxenme.org/download and get the latest installer for your current platform.

NME will install Haxe for you. If you are using Windows, you should check out the excellent FlashDevelop code editor for developing Haxe and NME projects. If you are running Linux or Mac OS X, you may want to try MonoDevelop instead. It is the editor I have been using on Linux, and I have been very happy with it so far. Continue reading How to Install Haxe, NME and MonoDevelop